After a neurotic accountant tells a failing Broadway producer he can scam investors with a flop. He searches for the worst script and worst director to stage a play with the hopes it closes on its opening week, only to discover a hit. The Producers

The Producers

Nir Shelter Singularity Asked on November 15, 2015 in Examples.
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1 Review(s)

When a milquetoast accountant explains to a washed-up Jewish producer how to make a fortune by producing a flop, the two partner up to produce a Broadway show guaranteed to bomb, a romantic musical about Hitler. (36 words)

It seems to me that the juicy bait on the hook of the story — how to win big at the bank by losing big at the box-office — is that that a romantic musical about Hitler is not being produced by an anti-Semite but by a Jew. (And now  I can’t get the lyrics for “Springtime for Hitler” out of my head.)  So I don’t think the logline needs to have  the plot twist, that the guaranteed flop becomes a smash hit and now they’re facing financial ruin and jail.

fwiw

dpg Singularity Reviewed on November 17, 2015.

Good point.

Different people I speak with about The Producers seam to find different parts of the story as the “juicy bait”. In most cases it’s either the plot twist, the idea of producing bad stuff as a means to success or Jews staging a play about Hitler. Having multiple layers of interest is part of what makes it such a good film.

on November 17, 2015.

Agree, it’s a concept with a lot of sizzle.

Packing it all into one logline:

When a neurotic accountant explains to a washed-up Jewish producer how more money in producing a flop than a hit, the two partner up to stage a Broadway show guaranteed to bomb, a romantic musical about Hitler, only go face bankruptcy and jail when it’s a smash hit.
(48 words)

But  my rule of thumb is that 40 words is the absolute tolerable maximum.  Which in this case is doable by focusing the logline on the main character, the producer:

When a washed-up Jewish producer realizes there’s more money in producing a flop than a hit, he stages a Broadway show guaranteed to bomb, a romantic musical about Hitler, only to face bankruptcy and jail when it’s a smash hit.
(40 words)

on November 17, 2015.
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