A good father and respected police officer is prisoned after he accidentally shot a young child, who was in the driving away robber´s car. He is trying to get his life back with a support of citizens of his city.

    Samurai Posted on August 24, 2016 in Drama.
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      Is there an event that gives an example of him trying to get his life back together?

      Is the story post release? Good concept.

      After serving a sentence for shooting a child accidentally a cop …… In an attempt to get his life back together.

      Fill in the gap

      Summitry Answered on August 24, 2016.
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        As Craig said what is the goal, in specific terms, that he must achieve in order to know that he has gotten his life back together? Otherwise “…get his life back together…” is too vague and unclear.

        On the same note what is the inciting incident? What out of the ordinary event motivates him so he MUST get his life back together? It can’t be the release from jail as he knew that was going to happen years before, what else can happen to him to make him need to take action now?

        Maybe his wife or ex wife asks the court to cancel his visitation rights with the kids? Though that seems rather harsh and inappropriate, it’s the kind of event I mean.

        Singularity Answered on August 24, 2016.
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          Hi Nir and Craig, the inciting incident happened when a cop doing his job to stop the robber,  shoots at tires, he didn´t know that robber brought his (robber´s) child to the robbery and accidentally the bullet hits the kid, cop is accused of murder and jailed, but citizens are sure he was just doing his job and was following all the rules. Now they demand  his freedom, same as his family, wife and kids. So i think my first logline addition  was wrong and caused misunderstanding. Nevertheless, ill try to come up with a better one following your advise  (forgive me my broken english) Thanks

          Samurai Answered on August 25, 2016.
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            He can’t go to prison unless tried and convicted in court.  That, it seems to me, is how the story might better be situated, in a courtroom rather than a prison.  His legal fight is to prove his innocence in a court of law, to  win a verdict of “not guilty” from a jury of his peers, his community.

            What would be his specific game plan to win his freedom from prison?   What can he do except rely on a lawyer to keep filing the paper work for appeals?

            fwiw

            Singularity Answered on August 25, 2016.
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              It may be different with such a young child, but since 9/11 and the militarization of America’s police force(they are often given old military equipment, and are given money in order to buy equipment to fight terrorists), the amount of police shootings in America is extremely high(in other countries such as Australia and the U.K, the police often kill less than ten people a year, while America killed hundreds each year), and the accountability of the police is low. Police who kill citizens hardly ever go to trial, usually only when there’s evidence of the officer lying or a cover-up. And in many of those cases, the police officers who killed the victims were in a different situation than shooting at moving car, because they were either standing right in front of the person they shot,  putting them in a choke hold, even beating them.
              Anyway, my point is, in real life there’s a pretty good chance this officer wouldn’t go to trial, or at least not convicted. Like the case where an officer shot a child with a toy gun and not was indicted. (Tamir Rice shooting)

              Summitry Answered on August 25, 2016.

              Also here is another thing i didn´t mention on my logline and i understand, it´s important, everything is happening in European country, not USA

              on August 26, 2016.

              What country? Makes a big difference.

              on August 26, 2016.
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                The problem with your sweeping generalization, Dkpough1, is the logline stipulates the protagonist ends up in prison.  Prima facie, as they say in legalese,  he was charged, tried in a court of law and convicted.

                Unfairly convicted.

                Perhaps you find that outcome unbelievable. I don’t .  I just don’t see how he can win his freedom from prison — what is game plan is  –other than relying on his lawyer.  Which kind of makes the lawyer the pivotal character.

                Singularity Answered on August 25, 2016.
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                  “Perhaps you find that outcome unbelievable. I don’t “
                  Unbelievable? No. But based on the real world, unlikely. Of course it depends on his reputation, the people indicting him, etc. So if maybe the cop were a frequent troublemaker or something, it would be more likely. It is something that no producer would probably be hung up about, either. After all,  it is Hollywood, not exactly known for accurate depictions.
                  However, if Snail chooses to tackle this issue, it would turn the story into something reflects and comments on the problems America has with its police force.
                  Problems such the militarization of the force, leading to the overuse of SWAT teams, time and resources police ineffectively use on things such the War on Drugs(it’s sole purpose, to decrease the use of drugs, has failed miserably. and those resources could be used to rehabilitate rather than criminalize), prostitution among other things.
                  And, of course, the number of pets police kill. 
                  Anyway, police should be held accountable for when their actions, especially when they kill someone they’re supposed to protect. This story doesn’t really seem to touch on that, the cop kills the child who is in a moving vehicle, and he didn’t even know the kid was in it. 

                  Summitry Answered on August 25, 2016.
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                    Of course, guilty officers should be held accountable.  But innocent cops, just trying to do their job with decency and fairness,  (and they do exist, lots of them)  should not be condemned or punished for the crimes of the bad ones.

                    In the current climate in the US in regards to law enforcement, the story in the logline swims against the tide of popular perceptions and opinion.  That’s what good drama should dare to do.

                    Just saying.

                    Singularity Answered on August 25, 2016.
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                      Even though by now it doesn’t really matter, I’m not exactly sure about your points. The point of my posts was that cops can shoot whomever they please and then get a paid vacation, they have very little accountability these days. Of course, there are those who are convicted, and those who do go to trial,  but the vast majority of cases do not end that way.
                      Mainly, I’m not sure where you got  ” innocent cops, just trying to do their job with decency and fairness,  (and they do exist, lots of them)  should not be condemned or punished for the crimes of the bad ones.” because the only thing I said was that cops who DO kill someone should be held accountable.

                      I’m not completely sure how you mean it’s going against common perception. I mean, a cop pursued a criminal, accidentally kills a child, and then is imprisoned for it. Perhaps a bit unfairly? Depends on how harsh the sentence is, but I see nothing that really does what you say.

                      And yes, what country is it?

                      Summitry Answered on August 26, 2016.

                      >>The point of my posts was that cops can shoot whomever they please and then get a paid vacation, they have very little accountability these days.

                      My point is: some do, most don’t.  But this is not the forum for that debate.   We agree that we disagree.  So it goes.

                      on August 26, 2016.
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