After losing her arm in a car accident, a prodigious but reckless chef reconciles with her ill father, who encourages her to seek redemption and forgiveness.

    Logliner Posted on June 12, 2019 in Drama.
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    7 Review(s)

      Redemption and forgiveness for what?

      I like the idea of a skilled chef losing her arm so is unable to do what she is good at but, for me, the goal should then be overcoming this adversity. It’s a physical disability and an emotional journey. The journey should be physical too BUT through that she goes on an emotional one.

      I feel like what we’ve got so far is the first act only. I want to know what she’s going to do next.

       

       

      Summitry Answered on June 12, 2019.
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        Act I should be she is already a highly skilled chef, she’s a hard ass, and isn’t well liked. Much quicker and you don’t have to worry about cramming her rise to where she is in 30mins. Chances are, before she was a great chef, she wasn’t quite as “hard-ass” and was more liked by those around her and it’s the nature of her desire to succeed that she pushed all those things aside to get to where she is. If the audience sees what she was like before she became the great chef, there’s a chance that where she ends up at the end will have less of an impact because the audience will have seen that she can be a better person already. Does that make any sense at all?

        I think she should be attending meetings in act II as this is where you’re going to meet the additional characters who provide the different perspectives on her point of view. Act II is all about her fighting between who she was and who she is and there needs to be people who represent both sides of this in her life – past and future – Father and fellow disabled person. As I mentioned before, through one of these characters (the B-Story) she has a turning point that pushes the story into Act III.

         

        Summitry Answered on June 12, 2019.

        Oh yeah sorry, we only see her working in the kitchen. I

        Act 1 opens with her in a meeting,  then telling her story as a flashback from being a kitchen porter, becoming a head chef and then running three Michelin starred restaurants. She burns the candle at both end until she drives home drunk from a wedding and crashes (two friends in the car survive).

        Act 2a is her now struggling to run her restaurants, eventually losing them and moving back home.

        Act 2b is her attending mandatory meetings and rehabilitation and getting a job working in a small cafe.  Seemingly back on track until her father dies.

        Act 3 is her coming to terms with that, until his will leaves her enough money to setup her own restaurant. Which she does, but invites people from her meetings (fellow rehab friends and disabled friends) to work there.

         

        on June 12, 2019.
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          You’ve got an interesting 1st Act ,  the accident and loss that triggers her crisis.  And I like the 3rd Act resolution.

          But loglines are not about 3rd Acts.  Loglines should never contain a spoiler, how the protagonist solves her dramatic problem.  So that leaves the 2nd Act , fully half the film, where “she hits rock bottom”.  Well, how exciting  or interesting will that be to watch?   What distinguishes her descent to a “rock bottom” from all the other descents in all the other films about characters facing traumatic adversity?

          Singularity Answered on June 12, 2019.
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            I agree with mikepdley85.  Introduce her at the top of her game, the peak of her career.  And arrogant and difficult to work with.  She’s know how to cook, but not how deal with mere humans who  “crippled” by an inability to perform up to her standards. (Thus establishing the contrast  for the 3rd Act redemptive solution.)

            And then because of reckless hubris…

            About the 3rd Act:  It seems to me that it would be a more dramatically effective reconciliation if she’s not the beneficiary of his will.  Because the father doesn’t die  Rather he remains alive and  stakes her.  He demonstrates his love for her and his faith in her talent by cashing out the last of his IRA savings.  But that it isn’t enough. for her to start anew.  So he mortgages his home.  In the closing scene, she serves him his favorite dish and he raises a toast to her recovery and their reconciliation.  (Bringing closure to a backstory issue:  he’s never dined in one of her restaurants before.)

            fwiw

            Singularity Answered on June 13, 2019.

            I’m with dpg!

            In my head the father is her link to who she was. He made her the reckless, arrogant person she was… always searching for her father’s approval perhaps? But when she finally starts doing it for herself, he starts accepting her and their relationship strengthens. Her relationship with her father is mirrored with how she deals with others, she is crippled by her inability to not perform to her father’s standards and she treats others the same way. Emotionally she is disabled and only by becoming physically disabled does she become emotionally able.

            on June 13, 2019.

            I had it the other way round to be honest. Her mother left when she was young, and her father closed himself off. She thinks it’s because she wasn’t good enough to make her mother stay, and her father was too weak to fight for her mother.

            It’s this belief that men are weak, that she is able to succeed in a male dominated field.

            The turn is that, her father wasn’t weak but actually kicked the mother out, for substance abuse or cheating (?), to protect his daughter.

             

            on June 13, 2019.
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              >>Emotionally she is disabled and only by becoming physically disabled does she become emotionally able.

              Bingo!  Spot on!

              And if the dad divorced his mother for her drug abuse, then shouldn’t he refuse to take his daughter in for the same reason in Act 2.  She’s turned out to be no better than her mother.

              Which would intensify the emotional catharsis of his Act 3 reversal and act of reconciliation.

              Singularity Answered on June 13, 2019.
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                ^^^

                A prodigious chef falls off the tracks after losing her arm in a car accident. At rock bottom, she finds redemption by setting up a restaurant that only employs people with disabilities.

                That’s the full start to end, with reconciliation with parents and former friends thrown into the mix.

                Logliner Answered on June 12, 2019.

                MUCH better!!

                I’d remove “falls off the tracks” and make the story central to her perhaps. Employing only disabled people is great but it should be about her and, to me, employing disabled people is like act III – she spends act II fighting against her disability and trying hard to be who she was but through a B-story (a person she meets in group therapy for disabled people or something) she learns to work with it and accept this new version of herself at the act II to III break. Through act II she loses a lot of people who were keen to work with her because they think she’ll fail so in act III she employs disabled people instead.

                I think it would depend when you saw certain things happening to be honest. I think it would be good if she was perhaps in the process of setting up her restaurant when she has the accident and if she gives it up she’ll go bankrupt… ups the stakes a bit and provides a physical tie to her former life that represents her emotional struggle.

                Hope this helps.

                on June 12, 2019.

                After losing her arm in an accident, a self-centred chef must re-learn her craft single-handedly in order to open her own restaurant on time or face bankruptcy.

                on June 12, 2019.
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                  Yeah basically, Act 1 is her becoming a prodigal chef, until she loses her arm.

                  Act 2 is her trying and failing to come to terms with that, losing her restaurants etc unable to accept it spiralling in to alcohol abuse, she moves back home with her father.

                  Act 3 is her redemption, begins cooking for fun, attending meetings, opens a new restaurant.

                   

                  A prodigal chef loses her arm in a car accident – unable to come to terms with being unable to cook to her former standards, she moves back home with her father but finds a chance at redemption.

                  Logliner Answered on June 12, 2019.
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