Being forbidden to love maakes managing the world's perception of love easy. But when Rose experiences love for himself he puts his job and existence at stake.

    Love and Roses

    Default Posted on December 29, 2012 in Public.
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    16 Review(s)

      First things first: Rose tends to be a female name. I’m still not sure whether this particular ‘Rose’ is male, or whether I’m not understanding the logline… Is this detail really worth confusing everyone over?

      Okay, so no one is allowed to love (romantic love only, presumably. Are they allowed to love their children, siblings, parents?) I’m not quite sure where managing the perception of something forbidden comes into this – if something’s forbidden, people tend either to avoid it like the plague, or rush out and do it, so I really don’t understand the importance of how they *perceive* something they can’t legally do…

      I think this needs a big dollop of irony. ‘Rose’ needs to be in charge of enforcing the ban (a popular trope, see Logan’s Run, etc), and then he’s tempted to break it. Then he turns the world upside down to restore love to everyone, by overthrowing the system he used to work for. It’s a bit of a familiar idea, people being banned from feeling emotions by a futuristic society, but I guess it could be made to work…

      Penpusher Answered on December 29, 2012.
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        I find myself trying to decipher this logline.

        The story looks interesting but I would try re-writing the logline with a little more clarity so it isn’t as confusing.

        Singularity Answered on December 29, 2012.
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          Rose = Eros = Cupid (get it?) so yes its worth the trouble for me personally. If guys can get away with “Ashley” and girls with “jack” then I don’t mind.

          Would changing Perception of “love” to “romance” clear up some confusion? I see I always confuse people with my log-lines.

          People can love, it’s just that they THINK they fall in love, but most of the time someone like Rose is pulling the strings. So it isn’t Rose controlling if people love or not, but rather how they process the idea to keep people in the illusion of true love exists or what have you.

          I tried putting the irony there by having Rose do his job but then break the rule that allows him to do his job effectively.

          Of course I don’t have paragraphs likes these to describe the movie so If I didn’t communicate these things effectively how can I do so?

          Thanks for your help! I really appreciate it.

          Default Answered on December 29, 2012.
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            See the above comment and let me know. That would be awesome!

            Default Answered on December 29, 2012.
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              Is rose forbidden to love?

              Singularity Answered on December 29, 2012.
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                Yes sir. I guess that’s tripping everyone up huh? now that I’m looking at it. It’s who is forbidden to love that is confusing people. It’s only Rose that’s forbidden.

                Default Answered on December 29, 2012.
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                  Being forbidden to love makes Rose’s job of managing the worlds perception of romance easy. But when he experiences the emotion for himself, he puts his job and existence at stake.

                  Less confusing?

                  Default Answered on December 29, 2012.
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                    When Rose, the god of love, breaks the rules and falls for a mortal he must… (Not sure where to go from here)

                    He must… choose between the woman of his dreams or his immortality???

                    Unless I know the penalty for Rose falling in love, it’s difficult to figure out a good example of where you could go with this logline.

                    Singularity Answered on December 29, 2012.
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                      Yes, that is much less confusing

                      Singularity Answered on December 29, 2012.
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                        btw, this is a great idea

                        Singularity Answered on December 29, 2012.
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