Minutes after a woman flies solo into motherhood with artificial insemination, she meets Mr. Right who thinks she’s his dream girl–but isn’t ready for children.

    (25 words)

    The Back-up Plan
    (2010)

    Singularity Posted on December 14, 2019 in Examples,   Romance.
    Add Comment
    3 Review(s)

      Can we talk about this film?

      Of course, this logline doesn’t conform to the standard formula. It sets up the situation, the inciting incident, the gotcha in their relationship — but no specific objective goal is stated.

      Well, that’s the way the movie unfolds, folks. It checks the boxes of all the usual tropes of pregnancy (morning sickness, mood swings, upended sex life, the panic drive to the delivery room) but there is nothing that creates dramatic tension other than the dude alternating between hot and cold about committing to a relationship with her.

      What was the story hook that got a major star, Jennifer Lopez, attached to the project?  Answer: the setup and inciting incident.  And that is the hook that got me to rent the video.

      Obvious the dramatic question is: will the two come to terms of endearment, find true love in the end? That’s the default dramatic question of the romance genre.

      And in this flick, if they can’t, while it’s a bummer, she’s a successful business woman. She can support and raise the kids herself. This is JLo: she will survive and thrive.

      The flick got a middling 5.3 rating at IMDB. The critics green tomatoed it (18) and the audience threw half ripe tomatoes (48). The movie barely made it’s budget back, and that was probably thanks of the star, JLo.

      Actually, I found this movie instructive about the structure and mechanics of the romance genre when compared to adaptations of novels by Jane Austen, the grandmistress, the queen of the romantic genre. But that’s another discussion.

      Singularity Answered on December 14, 2019.
      Add Comment

        “…The flick got a middling 5.3 rating at IMDB. The critics green tomatoed it (18) and the audience threw half ripe tomatoes (48). The movie barely made it’s budget back, and that was probably thanks of the star, JLo…”

        Rather telling, don’t you think…

        Oh come on, it’s me!

        Yup, the logline faild to arouse interest in me, and it seems the film followed suit. This sounds like a good example of how a lack of conflict results in a bland story and logline.

        Singularity Answered on December 14, 2019.

        >>>sounds like a good example of how a lack of conflict results in a bland story and logline.

        Yup.

        on December 14, 2019.

        The logline does not give us a view of the second act. It’s very vague. If that can be fixed the log line can be better. In my opinion, the idea has good conflict which is also a high concept.
        Nir, you know better. Your 2 cents?

        on December 26, 2019.
        Add Comment

          Using my as-yet paid-for artistic license, this is what i would have done with this:

          “Despite knowing he was the backup plan for the love of his love, a forlorn man is horrified to realize after helping her get pregnant she just met her Mr. Right, and is determined to win her heart at all costs.”

          This tracks to a differing place but offers a ramped up plot line.

          Penpusher Answered on December 21, 2019.

          You are changing the protagonist in your version of the improved logline, which makes it a different movie. Don’t you think @wdcurry

          on December 26, 2019.
          Add Comment

          Your Review

          By posting your review, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.