When a controversial podcast host believes an invasion is coming on Halloween, his friends bring him to a party to get his mind off of the ridiculous theories; but when one of the host’s friends reads a spell from an ancient book that unleashes several deities, the host and his friends must survive the night to break the spell.

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    Penpusher Posted on June 15, 2019 in Horror.

    My idea was to have this as a full found-footage movie in the style of Cloverfield, mixed with elements from other horror movies like “Dog Soldiers”, “The Evil Dead”, “Hereditary”, “The Witch”, and “30 Days of Night”.

    on June 15, 2019.
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      Logline Suggestion:

      When a forewarning podcast host attends a Halloween party, his friend reads a spell from an ancient book that unleashes a pack of evil gods, where the host and party guests must survive the night to  break the spell.

      Penpusher Answered on June 17, 2019.
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        >>>When a controversial podcast host believes an invasion is coming on Halloween, his friends bring him to a party to get his mind off of the ridiculous theories

        All that is setup and foreshadowing.

        >>>but when one of the host’s friends reads a spell from an ancient book that unleashes several deities,

        This is the inciting incident that triggers the plot. And consequently, the event that should lead off the logline. Something like “As Halloween revelers amuse themselves by reciting a spell from an ancient book…”

        I should think it as important to plant the ancient book and its import in the setup as the podcaster’s premonitions.

        fwiw

        Singularity Answered on June 15, 2019.

        I tried use the midpoint reversal formula for this logline, which is why I put “but when one of the host’s friends reads a spell from an ancient book that unleashes several deities…” in the second half as I felt I would be jumping into the action too early and not give some backstory to the main protagonist (the podcast host).

        The ancient book is definitely part of the podcaster’s premonitions, though. Before rewriting this logline I initially had the arrival of the creatures and evil gods as a mystery but decided an ancient book would be the idea to avoid confusion.

        on June 15, 2019.
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          I like it!

          “When … believes”: I’d like to know specifically what makes him believe this. Who is the messenger? Is there a messenger? As I’m a sucker for a good Inciting Incident/Call To Adventure, I want to see that moment on the screen – and I want it to be powerful. “Believe” isn’t strong enough as an Event.

          I am assuming that the host is the Hero. Other than being ‘controversial’, I’d like to know if he has a weakness/flaw that he needs to overcome, or that turns out to be a strength. Is he superstitious?

          Finally – ‘spell’ stories are hard to tell/sell because the audience cannot reasonably foresee how the spell can be lifted. Often the spell is lifted when the main character changes their behaviour for the better, has learned something etc. In horror this may be slightly different, as the spell/antagonist often lives on beyond the movie…

          All that said, I think it’s a fun setup with a plot promise we can easily visualise.

          I hope this helps.

          BTW – Welcome to Logline It, and thank you for posting & reviewing! 🙂

          Samurai Answered on June 15, 2019.

          Thank you!

          The host is the hero, and his weakness is a tragedy he dealt with in the past regarding the loss of one of his closest friends during a Halloween festival in the past that led him to believe something is out there.

          I tried to do a “spell” for this one because I tried to think of a way to manifest the antagonists (that is the deities who walk the Earth).

          This really helped, will be rewriting this as I go along the way! 🙂

          on June 15, 2019.
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            Gemini Silver:
            The ancient book is indeed an effective prop for setting up the unleashing.    In this story,  it creates the dramatic problem and the protagonist’s objective goal.  However, the midpoint reversal (MPR) occurs long  after the dramatic problem has been set in motion and the protagonist has locked into his objective goal.

            For information on the purpose and placing of the  MPR  check out Karel Segers’ YouTube video on the MPR and  his article on turning points.

            Singularity Answered on June 15, 2019.
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