When an 8ft hairy black monster begins following him around and disrupting his life, a lonely divorcee must find a way to get rid of it before it controls his entire existence.

    Summitry Posted on October 31, 2019 in Comedy.

    Title: Hank

    on October 31, 2019.
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    3 Review(s)

      I have to say that I would watch that movie! But I do would like to know what the lovely divorcee has to lose by not having the lonely divorcee disrupt his life. What life? Is the monster terrifying or annoying ?

      Penpusher Answered on October 31, 2019.

      You’re right… maybe he needs to have the hint of more of a life. The monster is more annoying – so when the guy is typing on his computer, the monster just comes and randomly punches letters in, changes channels randomly on TV, knocks drinks out of his hand, etc, etc.

      on October 31, 2019.
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        Is this a part of his imagination or a real monster?

        If the former, then the conflict is inner if the latter then the conflict is external.

        If it’s an inner conflict, you would need to describe the event that made him need to face his inner problems. Was it the divorce? Was it something he or his ex-wife did?

        If the monster is real, then the monster’s appearance is the inciting event, which makes getting rid of it the goal. How did the monster come into being and find him? Was it a camping trip? A magical appearance out of thin air? Either way, whatever force or event brought the monster into his life, needs to be described in the logline.

         

        Singularity Answered on November 2, 2019.

        The monster is imagined and it’s the divorce (and subsequently having to live on his own, single, feeling unloved) that triggers Hank’s appearance.

        on November 4, 2019.
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          What are the stakes? I only ask because I am not sure what you mean by, “Controls his entire existence” Does this mean the monster is going to mind control the lead character and take over his body?

          In other words, what will the lead character lose if he does not get rid of the monster?

          However, besides that, I think this logline is pretty close and has a great hook.

          Singularity Answered on November 2, 2019.

          Yeah, you’re right. The stakes could be clearer.

          Hank represents the protagonist’s depression. Everything Hank does is something symptomatic with depression. When one of the protagonist’s friends calls him up, Hank knocks the phone out of the protagonist’s hand – Hank shuts the protagonist off from the world, encourages drinking, stops him getting out of bed (by physically lying on top of him). It starts off as a frustration but visually, quite comedic, but ultimately, Hank gets darker and more sinister, eventually offering the protagonist a bottle of pills (or similar). The protagonist’s life is at stake but, in my head at least, I didn’t want to make it too obviously about depression and I wanted to suggest (by the “control his entire existence”) that depression is a force that takes over your body and mind.

          Would really appreciate your further thoughts on the above.

          on November 4, 2019.
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